Posted in Entertainment Law, IP Law

Plan to make Google pay for news hits rocks

In a moment when the future of media outlet is endangered by the cracks in the IP system, the EU is pondering whether to apply a link tax that big platforms (e.g. Google, FB and Twitter) would need to pay to newspapers.

Favoured by Italy, Spain and France and opposed by the NL and UK, this amendment to the copyright law may be a bookmark likely to set a trend in the rest of the world to incentivise a similar legal discipline of this matter.

Yet, a similar attempt has been already run in Spain, where Google closed its Google news section, readers headed directly o the newspapers’ website and the final losers were the smaller companies depending on such business model.

Similarly, Germany attempt a similar (although softer) law whose final result was that Google only showed news from that publishers agreeing to be linked for free.

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Posted in Entertainment Law

Ireland to get social media watchdog

It turns out Ireland is trying to regulate abusive content, bullying and harassment with a light-touch legislation: a code of conduct and a watchdog.

Social platforms like Facebook and Twitter will be held accountable for the breaches by their users.

At the same time, the EU Commission is considering drafting some guideline on how to red-flag similar issues on similar platforms.

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Posted in Entertainment Law

How In-House Lawyers Can Protect the Company From Social Media Risk

Allegedly, the trend in the States is to have such policies more “approachable”. Dell’s one (since Garcia’s entry as GC), is to have it short and cover as much as possible, as well as undergoing some review a couple times per year.

If you are going to draft one in the States, watch out: the National Labor Relations struck down some of theme for being too restrictive.

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Posted in Entertainment Law

Youth programmes broadcast on French public television will be kept free of advertising from January 2018

That’s the Nth evidence that even without a government, a country can go on.

Under-12-y.o. children are considered particularly vulnerable, hence why commercials on channels will be banned 15 minutes before and after airing commercial programs targeted at this age from 1/1/2018.

One of the criticised effect of commercials in France is the rise of obesity and the majority of people is allegedly in favour of this new law. Watch out, this will affect both linear and VOD content.

Fall in revenues estimated in €20m per year.

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Posted in Entertainment Law, IP Law

Rechterlijk verbod tegen Live Bioscoop op Facebook

This facebook pages broadcasts on a daily base free movies.

The pages currently enlists 26’000 users and thanks to the free donations required, it as possible to identify the author of this wrongdoing.

Fine will amount to 2’000 per day with a max of 50’000.

After KAT was shut down by US law enforcement, the whole world is more effectively tackling the IP violations online, what happened?

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